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Shabbat Evening Services
Friday evening services begin at 6:30 pm all year round and are held in the Weicholz Sanctuary.

Our services are filled with music and joy and are geared toward the entire family. We welcome visitors, and have no fear if you are unfamiliar with the Hebrew. We encourage you to sing along in the English or even by humming “li li li” if you feel so moved. Each service provides opportunity for personal reflection as well as communal worship. Our music includes camp-style songs as well as traditional Hebrew chant.

  • Beginning on the third Friday of October, we will begin holding a monthly K’tonton* Tot Shabbat  from 6:00-6:20 pm. This program is geared toward families with children ages 0-5 so that they may experience the joy of Shabbat on their own level.  It will take place every third Friday of the month and many of the children stay to sing a few songs at the beginning of the main service at 6:30 pm.
  • On the third Friday of the month, we hold a joyous and fun Shabbat Experience Service.
  • A wine and cheese reception is held the third Friday of the month beginning at 6:00 pm.
  • An Oneg Shabbat is held twice a month

Click here to read, “Understanding the Shabbat Service

Shabbat Morning Services

Shabbat morning begins with “Bagel Academy” Torah study held from 9-9:45am in the Hall of Honor. We read the Torah portion of the week and discuss what it meant in its own time, how our sages have interpreted it in the past, and what it means to us today. No prior Torah or Hebrew knowledge is required.

Services begin at 10:00 am.  We welcome congregant participation, through either reading Torah or sharing in other honors.

Attire for Shabbat services is typically business casual.  Friday evening and Saturday morning services are approximately one hour.

Click here to read about the symbolism of the objects and layout in our Weicholz Sanctuary, as explained by our Rabbi Emeritus Mark Wm. Gross.

 **PLEASE JOIN US** 

*The Adventures of K’tonton was a series of books written in 1935. K’ton Ton, taken from the Hebrew word for small, may have been a young boy the size of a thumb, but he was a robust, rambunctious little guy: Whether dodging the flashing blade of a fish chopper, getting folded into a hamentashen, riding on a lulav, or whipping down the street on a spinning dreidle, the kid was a wee, early action hero, a role model for the littlest American Jews.